Get the Latest Updates from Real Facts NC

2020 Filing and Retirement Tracker

See who is running (and who is not running) for NC House, Senate, and top-ticket statewide offices in 2020. This page will be update daily during the candidate filing period which runs December 2 to December 20, 2019.

Read More

North Carolina Legislator Profile: Rick Horner (R-Johnston, Nash)

Sen. Rick Horner (R-Johnston, Nash) is currently serving his second term in the North Carolina Senate. Prior to his election to Senate, Horner served as a board member of the Nash-Rocky Mount Public Schools Board for over fourteen years.

Since his election in 2016, Horner has made inconsistent claims about his support for health care access and education. Horner said the state should “take a serious look” at Medicaid expansion, but provided no further information on his position. Horner supported the 2019 budget, which failed to expand Medicaid. The 2019 Republican budget would have cut DHHS’s budget by $42 million.

Horner said he wants to bring urgency, accountability, and quality to education in North Carolina but as a lawmaker his votes did not support these claims. Horner, whose wife is a teacher, campaigned on teacher pay and said, “we need to listen to teachers,” but criticized the teacher rally and failed to follow through with his votes. Horner was the primary sponsor of a bill requiring school districts to repeal discipline policies that warned about racial disparities. Read more here.

"Not everyone up here was screaming bloody murder," Horner said when asked about the tensions between lawmakers and educators.” (Rocky Mount Telegram, 5/17/18)

 

Read More

21 unconstitutional laws passed under the cloud of a racial gerrymander

Running list of laws passed by the Republican-led NC legislature that have been found unconstitutional. 

Read More

North Carolina Legislator Profile: Rep. Greg Murphy (R-Pitt)

In this legislator profile, we focus on Rep. Gregory Murphy, the Republican representative from District 9. Murphy was appointed in 2015 to fill the vacancy created when Brian Brown left to work for Sen. Thom Tillis.

Since his appointment in 2015, Murphy has fallen in line with his Republican colleagues to enact policies that weaken environmental protections, shortchange education, and prioritize tax cuts for the wealthy over policies that help hardworking North Carolinians, including rural communities, teachers and families. Read more on Murphy here.

“I hope to be able to contribute to the health, education and welfare of the people of eastern North Carolina and our entire state.” - Greg Murphy (02/16/17)

(Source: NC Medical Society)
Read More

2019 NEA Report shows drop in per student spending in North Carolina

NEA released its 2019 Rankings and Estimates report last Monday. Updates show some positive changes, though the state still falls near the bottom in per student spending and average teacher salary.

Per student spending in NC remains near the bottom as Republican budgets consistently fail to meet classroom needs, spending nearly $3,000 below the national average per student.

  • The state dropped in rank from 39thto 42nd in per student spending between the 2016-17 school year and final 2017-18 numbers.
  • NEA’s 2018 report estimated the state would rank 39th in per student spending for 2017-18. Revised numbers drop NC to 42nd.
  • NC spends $2,957 below the national average per student.

Read More

The State of Public Education in NC: 2019

Since Republicans have taken power, we’ve witnessed a shrinking commitment to public education at all levels. While funding remains mired at pre-recession levels, Republicans prioritize tax cuts for corporations and those at the top. We need to invest in our teachers and students.

Thousands of N.C. teachers are gathered in Raleigh to ask lawmakers to prioritize education while the House Appropriations Committee meets to discuss the state’s 2019-20 budget. How did we get here?

Read More

During a hectic week, NCGA Republicans moved bills that could further cuts to education and continue advancements of unchecked privatization of public schools

A recent study found that just 23 percent of 4-year-olds in North Carolina have access to pre-k, below the national average. Meanwhile teacher pay in N.C. remains $7.8k less than the national average and NC teachers make 35.5 percent less than other 4-year college graduates in the state. Teachers pay out-of-pocket for school supplies to meet classroom needs. However, unchecked growth of charter schools has created a fiscal burden on local school districts of $500 to $700 per student.

A number of education-related bills are moving through the NCGA this session, but some appear to do more harm than good. We’ve highlighted three of those bills below.

H485 seeks to address a problem created by Republicans when they rolled back Smart-Start funding and, since then, continually failed to address the growing pre-k waitlist. Instead of funding pre-k, lawmakers want to send 4-year-olds to school online. Experts have concerns about the virtual learning pilot program because the value of pre-k “is less about the skill-learning in reading and math and more about skill-learning in social-emotional domains.” Virtual pre-k is a short-sighted effort to solve a funding failure with long-term impacts.

Read More

#TBT: Mark Johnson again claims NC teachers are making plenty of money

Mark Johnson falsely claims teachers make more than other college grads in NC

State Superintendent Mark Johnson doubled-down Wednesday on his controversial teacher pay comments from early 2018 during an interview on a conservative talk radio show.

Last year Johnson faced criticism for claiming that the base starting teacher salary was “good money” for people in their 20s. For reference, Johnson, 35, makes $127,561, but if he were still on the teacher pay scale would be making just $38,000

Johnson repurposed his now-debunked talking point to again claim teachers in NC are making plenty of money.

“[average teacher pay] is also more than the median wage of a person in North Carolina with a four-year degree for a year. That means that the average teacher is making more than what these median households in North Carolina make, families are bringing home,”Johnson said Wednesday on Wilmington’s Big Talker.

This claim is blatantly false, especially his point about what families are actually “bringing home.”

Read More

North Carolina Candidate Profile Update: Bobby Hanig (R-Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Washington)

Hanig ran unopposed for the Currituck Country Board of Commissioners in 2016 and was elected Chairman of the Board shortly after. During his time on the County Commission, Hanig proved he will follow in other Republicans’ footsteps and be yet another rubber stamp for the Republican age…

Read More
View All