Get the Latest Updates from Real Facts NC

UPDATED REPORT: NC Legislature Races to Watch 2018

With Democrats in 170 legislative seats, Republicans in 169, and even Libertarians filing in 35 legislative districts, 2018 is shaping up to be one of the most pivotal legislative elections in North Carolina history. And with no race on the ballot above Supreme Court, these elections will get more attention than ever before.

This report combines an analysis of district voting data, national and state polling plus qualitative factors like local issues and relative candidate strength. In total, we think that 35 House races and 13 Senate races are shaping up to have competitive campaigns run by both of the major parties in districts that could conceivably go to either. We have also identified a handful of other races worth keeping an eye on for other reasons.

We’ll look at the 35 House races and 13 Senate races we think will be the most competitive in the fall and a handfull of other races we think will be interesting to watch for other reasons. Read the House report here and the Senate report here

Read More

UPDATED: S75 is a Millionaires Protection Act

Making the Middle Class Tax Shift Permanent 

S75 – The “Millionaires Protection Act” is meant to make Republican Politicians radical tax shift from those at the top to working families permanent 

The “Millionaires Protection Act” would put a constitutional amendment on the ballot that locks in income tax rates that largely benefit the wealthy – over the last four years the average millionaire saved almost $15,000, while the average family saved only $6 (that’s SIX dollars) a year from the tax changes enacted by Republican politicians. 

  • While the income tax change may sound like a good deal, Raleigh politicians will look for other ways to raise taxes, and they’ll be left with sales taxes and fees that take a bigger bite out of the pockets of working families. What might seem saved in your paycheck you’ll more than pay back at the cash register.
  • How do we know they’ll raise sales taxes and fees – because that’s what they’ve been doing! Over the last three years Republicans have enacted three tax hikes on working families through news sales and service taxes and fees meaning you pay more to send a kid to college, put gas in your car and get it repaired, and even to keep the lights on at your home. 

In order to lock in these huge tax cuts for millionaires, Republican politicians will also be locking in current education funding that is lower per student than it was before the recession and causes North Carolina to be ranked 45th for teachers in the country.

Read More

North Carolina Legislator Profile: Linda Johnson (R-Carbarrus)

In this Real Facts Legislator Profile, we focus on Representative Linda Johnson, the Republican from District 83. One of the “top budget-writers”, Johnson serves as a chairman of the House Appropriations Committee and the House K-12 Education Committee. Before being elected…

Read More

North Carolina Legislator Profile: Rep. Mike Clampitt (R-Haywood, Jackson, Swain)

Real Facts NC’s legislator profile series continues to examine key North Carolina legislators. Here we look at Republican Representative Mike Clampitt, a Republican representative from House District 119 in Haywood, Jackson, and Swain Counties. Clampitt, a freshman legislator, had run twice before against incumbent Joe Sam Queen for H119 before finally beating Queen by around 300 votes in November 2016. Before being a perennial candidate Clampitt worked at the legislature.

In his first term in the NC House, Clampitt has quickly forgotten his district, supporting economic policies that benefit the weathly over working families in his district. Read more on Clampitt here.

(Source: WYFF)
Read More

North Carolina Legislator Profile: Rep. John Sauls (R-Harnett, Lee)

In this legislator profile, we focus on Rep. John Sauls, a Republican representative from District 51 in Harnett and Lee Counties. Sauls served in the General Assembly as a Republican from 2003 until 2007, when he left both the party and public office. In 2016 Sauls rejoined the party and was re-elected. He serves on the appropriations committee and as the chairman of the Education-Community College committee.

Sauls consistently supported policies that shortchange education at every level in N.C. He repeatedly voted for environmental policies that jeopardize access to clean water and clean air while also threatening rural economic development. Sauls supported a budget that prioritized tax cuts over policies that benefit working people, including teachers, families, and the elderly. Read more on Rep. Sauls here.

“I will continue to fight for more resources for our public schools and to ensure these resources are being used in the classrooms not wasted by bureaucrats.” - John Sauls

(Source: Harnett News)
Read More

Unconstitutional GOP majority proposes budget—our first take

This unconstitutionally elected Republican majority continues to legislate, not on behalf of the people of North Carolina, but on behalf of their billionaire backers. Instead of protecting the middle class and building world-class public schools, this budget gives tax breaks to billionaires. Under this budget, North Carolina will keep falling behind when it doesn’t have to.

  • The Republican budget fails our schools, middle class families, and the future of our economy at a time when we do not have to.
  • Cooper found a way to raise teacher pay more than 5% next year. Republicans only offer 3.3%. Instead of investing in classrooms, Republicans are giving millions in tax breaks to billionaires.
  • Cooper offered free community college for high school graduates, money to help teachers pay for out-of-pocket expenses, and eliminated the waitlist for pre-K. Republicans did none of those things.
  • Under this budget, we are still spending less that we did before the recession per student, teachers are still underpaid, and we have seven thousand fewer teaching assistants than we did in 2008.
  • Instead of prioritizing education, Republicans are undercutting our kids and it’s our economy that will suffer as North Carolina falls farther and farther behind other states and competitors like China and India. 

In addition to education, the GOP budget fails to provide for critical areas of need for rural North Carolina - including broadband and economic development..

  • Governor Cooper's budget invests $20 million to expand access to broadband and improve the economy of rural North Carolina, while the Republican budget would spend $250,000 on state IT bureaucrats.
  • Cooper proposed $30 million for a ready-sites program to attract new jobs to rural areas. The Republican budget leaves rural areas behind, choosing to spend only $2 million on ready-sites.

The GOP budget also wastes money on projects of the extreme right:

  • The Republican budget spends $1.3 million on an anti-abortion advocacy group that masquerades as a provider of health services to women, pushing dangerous and misleading propaganda on vulnerable women.
  • The GOP spends $40 million on private school vouchers which send tax dollars to unaccountable private and religious schools.

 

Read More

North Carolina’s reputation and economy suffers after McCrory signed HB2 into law

Governor McCrory signed HB2, as a result, many major US corporations, including Apple, Google, Twitter, American Airlines have publically condemned this decision. The backlash from the business and sports communities has been overwhelming and swift. Here are the facts: IBM, a large North …

Read More

Personal income crisis hits fever pitch

Hungry for work (High Point Enterprise) For NC workers, pay stays stubbornly flat (WRAL) Median household income decreases in NC (Winston-Salem Journal) The incomeless recovery (The Progressive Pulse) Carolina, please come back (Salisbury Post Op-ed) Most N.C. f…

Read More

South Carolina Labor Force Grows, While NC’s Shrinks

According to the latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, South Carolina’s labor force is growing to record levels while North Carolina’s labor force shrinks to the lowest point since 1976. SC unemployment rate declines, record workforce cited South Carolina’s u…

Read More
View All