Reports

REPORT: "Carolina Cares" puts politicians between patients and their doctors

The Republican health care plan puts politicians between patients and their doctors and fails thousands of North Carolina families by making health care more costly and complex. Read more here.
  • The 2019 Republican health care plan fails to cover thousands of North Carolina families by putting needless bureaucracy between patients and their doctors.
    • Most people who lose coverage under work requirement plans are complying with requirements and are dropped due to reporting issues.
    • 91,000 lost coverage after Indiana implemented a plan cited as the model by Republican legislators in North Carolina.
    • 17,000 lost coverage in Arkansas after the state passed work requirements later struck down by a federal judge.
  • The Republican plan puts politicians between patients and their doctors and creates a more costly and complex health care system.
    • Work requirements and premiums increase uncompensated care costs for hospitals that treat people regardless of whether or not they are insured. A system that forces more people to use the hospital to get care costs more.
    • Work requirements and premiums are a waste of taxpayer money.
    • Work requirements in other states have cost between $70 million and $170 million to implement; the federal government will not pay for much of the cost of implementation.
  • Most people eligible for Medicaid are already working and more red tape will make it harder for people in low-wage jobs to access care.
    • In Arkansas, similar legislation increased the number of uninsured people.

 

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MEDICAID REPORT PART III: Everyone benefits from Medicaid expansion

Everyone benefits from Medicaid expansion, especially residents of rural areas, veterans, people with mental illness, and people in the coverage gap.

Read the full report here.

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2019 NEA Report shows drop in per student spending in North Carolina

NEA released its 2019 Rankings and Estimates report last Monday. Updates show some positive changes, though the state still falls near the bottom in per student spending and average teacher salary.

Per student spending in NC remains near the bottom as Republican budgets consistently fail to meet classroom needs, spending nearly $3,000 below the national average per student.

  • The state dropped in rank from 39thto 42nd in per student spending between the 2016-17 school year and final 2017-18 numbers.
  • NEA’s 2018 report estimated the state would rank 39th in per student spending for 2017-18. Revised numbers drop NC to 42nd.
  • NC spends $2,957 below the national average per student.

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MEDICAID REPORT PART II: Republican plan won’t close the gap and will cost more

Republican health care plan could result in thousands losing coverage and is more costly and complex to implement than Medicaid expansion. Read the full report here.
  • The 2019 Republican health care planfails to cover thousands of North Carolina families.
    • Most people who lose coverage under work requirement plans are complying with requirements and are dropped due to reporting issues.
    • After Indiana implemented a plan cited as the model for the Republican plan 91,000 people were dropped from coverage
    • 17,000 Arkansans lost coverage under the state’s work requirements that were struck down by a federal judge
  • Implementation of the Republican plan would be more costly and complex than Medicaid Expansion.
    • Work requirements and premiums increase uncompensated care costs for hospitals which treat people regardless of whether or not they are insured. A system that forces more people to use the hospital to get care costs more.
    • States did not save tax dollars when they implemented work requirements and premiums.
    • Work requirements in other states have cost between $70 million and $170 million to implement, the federal government will not pay for much of the cost of implementation.

Read the full report here.

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MEDICAID REPORT PART 1: The Current Costs of Health Care in N.C.

NC already has some of the most expensive health care in the country. Refusing to expand Medicaid will keep health care expensive.  

  • NC is the second most expensive state for health care overall and NC residents who buy their own health care pay the third highest monthly premiums in the nation.
    • Forgoing Medicaid expansion will cost NC about $40 billion, some of which is federal taxpayer dollars from North Carolinians funding Medicaid in other states.
    • The federal government will cover 90 percent of the costs of Medicaid in expansion states forever. Currently it only covers half of the cost in NC.
  • Premiums for people who buy their own health insurance are7 percent lower in states that have expanded Medicaid.
    • Uncompensated care costs at hospitals are lower in Medicaid expansion states where more people are insured and thus able to pay hospital bills for emergency care.
    • Medicaid work rules will increase uncompensated care costs for hospitals.
  • Federal taxes paid by NC residents are going to other states.
  • Instead of saving money, Medicaid work requirements can add to health care costs and waste taxpayer dollars.
    • Work requirements could cost anywhere from $70 million to $170 million to implement and could more than double monthly premiums.
  • Not closing the gap will make health care even more expensive in NC.

Read the full report here.

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