Legislator Profile

North Carolina Legislator Profile Update: Rep. Scott Stone (R-Mecklenburg)

Scott Stone was appointed to House District 105 in May 2016 and won the election for the seat in November of the same year.He does not have any prior political experience, as he lost the race for Charlotte Mayor in both 2015 and 2011 and lost a race for Arlington County Board (VA) in 1996.

Stone is out-of-touch with his constituents. He added $287,000 worth of “housekeeping buildings” to his $459,500 home, meanwhile, he voted for bills that make it difficult for North Carolinians to get ahead. Stone blindly followed his party’s lead, voting to block an amendment that would have expanded Medicaid for several North Carolinians and voting in favor of several other bills that fail to protect working families in NC. He opposed raising the minimum wage and did not want to allow affordable housing near his south Charlotte neighborhood.

Despite boasting about the fact that he has children in the NC public school system, Stone has repeatedly voted for bills during his short time in office that fail to adequately fund public schools. He claims diversity in schools is a “politically driven issue” and opposes busing to increase diversity in Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools, claiming it is “not the answer.” Stone said, “the legislature is responsible for the education of students across the state,” but he has voted for Republican budgets that continue to fail NC’s education system.

Following the shooting in Parkland, FL, Stone followed his party’s lead and voted against amendments made by Democrats to a school safety bill that would have added gun-control restrictions. Stone prioritized gun rights over the safety of children at school. He once again proved he is out of touch with North Carolinians and will blindly follow the Republican party at any cost.

Click here for more about Stone's record. 

Photo: WSOCTV
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North Carolina Legislator Profile Update: Rep. John Sauls (R-Harnett & Lee)

Rep. John Sauls is a Republican preacher representing House District 51. He served two terms from 2003-2006 and then retired, claiming to expand his congregation. However Sauls then retired from leading his congregation, handing over the pulpit to his higher-energy son, only to run for the NC House again in 2016. Since 2016 Sauls has served without distinction, sponsoring very few bills and missing many votes due to absences. He recently published Facebook ads listing the wrong district number and is known for being absent from floor votes and committee meetings. However, the votes he has been present for continue the Republican trend of prioritizing corporations and millionaires over the people in their districts.

Read on for more about Sauls’ record.

Photo: The Sanford Herald
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North Carolina Legislator Profile Update: Stephen Ross (R- Alamance)

Stephen Ross was first elected to public office in the early 1990s, serving on the Burlington City Council for 16 years. He went on to serve as Burlington’s mayor from 2003-2007, then won election to the NC House in 2012. 

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North Carolina Legislator Profile Update: Debra Conrad (R-Forsyth)

Photo: Winston-Salem Journal Debra Conrad was on the Forsyth County Commission for 18 years and has been in office since 1994. While there, she caused tension between the County Commission and the school board. She repeatedly voted against funding more education, instead voting in favor of …

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North Carolina Legislator Profile Update: John Bradford (R-Mecklenburg)

John Bradford was first elected to the Cornelius Town Board in 2011. While there, he supported hiring a private contractor to operate and build I-77 toll lanes. However, when I-77 became a political liability after he was elected to the NCGA, he changed his position. This type of political “courage” is indicative of the rest of his political career.

Bradford repeatedly failed to protect North Carolina children and families while in the House. Bradford voted to block debate on several common sense gun law reforms, including a “red flag” law that would keep guns out of the hands of people convicted of domestic violence, rape or other violent crimes. Bradford failed to keep N.C. schools safe by blocking these amendments to a school safety bill that was criticized for not doing enough.

Bradford also failed give children the tools they need to succeed. Bradford said, “spending more in education will not magically solve the problems we are facing” despite years of failing to raise per student spending or teacher salaries to the national average.  

Bradford pushed for laws that protect landlords like himself while putting every day North Carolinians at risk. Bradford is a property manager and owns Park Avenue Properties, which faced dozens of complaints according to Better Business Bureau, but still voted in favor of eviction practices that were deemed “unfair and deceptive”.

Bradford used his position in the House to protect himself and his own interests rather than helping the families in his district.

 

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North Carolina Legislator Profile Update: Nelson Dollar (R-Wake)

Rep. Nelson Dollar is a Republican representing House District 36. He has been in the General Assembly for over a decade and has been senior Chairman of the Appropriations Committee since Republicans took control of the House in 2011. Working as House Republicans main budget writer Dollar, according to the News & Observer, “officially […] is senior chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. Unofficially, he’s the House gatekeeper.”

 

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North Carolina Legislator Profile Update: Ted Davis (R-New Hanover)

In this Real Facts Legislator Profile, we focus on Ted Davis Jr., the Republican representative from House District 19. A descendent of one of New Hanover’s wealthiest families, Davis followed an uneventful legal career with an unremarkable tenure as county commissioner. Davis switched affiliation to Republican for political expedience in order to run for public office.

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North Carolina Candidate Profile: Judge Barbara Jackson

In this Real Facts NC Candidate Profile, we turn our attention to the North Carolina Supreme Court and Associate Justice Barbara Jackson. Jackson was elected to the NC Supreme Court in 2010 and is running for re-election this upcoming November. Before becoming an Associate Justice, Jackson was elected as a judge on the NC Court of Appeals and served for six years. Prior to her judgeship, Jackson practiced law for fourteen years, including time as General Counsel to Republican Cherie Berry in the NC Department of Labor and in the office of Republican Governor James G. Martin. Read the full profile of Jackson here.

“We are compelled to exercise judicial restraint and defer to the General Assembly's judgment.” – Jackson in Dickson v. Rucho, on the right of the General Assembly to keep secret its communications about the 2011 legislative maps that were later ruled unconstitutional.

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North Carolina Legislator Profile: Linda Johnson (R-Carbarrus)

In this Real Facts Legislator Profile, we focus on Representative Linda Johnson, the Republican from District 83. One of the “top budget-writers”, Johnson serves as a chairman of the House Appropriations Committee and the House K-12 Education Committee. Before being elected…

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North Carolina Legislator Profile: Rep. Larry Yarborough (R-Person/Granville)

In this Real Facts Legislator Profile, we focus on Representative Larry Yarborough, the Republican from House District 2. Before joining the General Assembly in 2014, Yarborough was a County Commissioner in Person County.

Yarborough has a degree in chemical engineering and was the primary sponsor of H56, a bill that provided GenX funding and was tied to the repeal of the plastic bag ban in the Outer Banks.

Yarborough has consistently voted for more tax cuts over public education. He voted for the 2017 Republican budget that continue the trend of cutting taxes rather than raising per pupil spending and the 2016 and 2015 budgets that let education spending in NC fall even further behind.

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