house

The Dulin Factor: Part 1

Back in his seat, Dulin leaned over to a reporter: "Therein lies the Andy Dulin Factor," he said. "Nobody can do that as well as I can. It's not cocky. It's confident." Dulin, 52, is nothing if not confident.” (Charlotte Observer, 4/9/12)

Rep. Andy Dulin, once noted for his confident retail-style politics, has repeatedly failed to live up to his boasts. This begs the question, has the Andy Dulin Factor fizzled?

Dulin models Tommy Bahama at a 2012 Ballantyne After Dark fashion show
Photo: Ballantyne Breakfast Club

 

Dulin was called “George Bush-ish” for his fundraising in Charlotte City Council races despite several losses, but has failed to deliver in his first competitive House race

After second quarter campaign finance reports were filed last month, the Charlotte Observer reported that Democratic candidate for House District 104, lawyer Brandon Lofton, had almost twice as much on hand as the incumbent. Dulin’s City Council tactics, with money raised heavily from real estate developers who wanted his zoning votes, are not cutting it in higher profile races. Dulin, a long-time Charlotte insider, is being outraised by a first-time candidate.

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UPDATED REPORT: NC House Races to Watch 2018

With Democrats in 170 legislative seats, Republicans in 168, and even Libertarians and Constitution Party candidates filing in some seats, 2018 is shaping up to be one of the most pivotal legislative elections in North Carolina history. Additionally, with a record six constitutional amendments added to the ballot in the last month an already unpredictable cycle has been given an added twist.

This updated report combines an analysis of district voting data, national and state polling, and candidate fundraising numbers with qualitative factors like local issues and relative candidate strength. In total, Real Facts NC thinks that 36 House races are shaping up to have competitive campaigns run by both of the major parties in districts that could conceivably go to either.

Democrats need to pick up four seats in the House and six seats in the Senate to break the supermajority. They need 16 seats in the House and 11 seats in the Senate to win the majority. Ten of the competitive House districts in this report are already held by Democrats.

A number of Democratic challengers have outraised their Republican opponents in races featured here. Already, outside spending on broadcast and mail has been reported in 12 of the districts featured in this report and it seems likely that more is on the way as August heats up.

Check out the report here

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UPDATED REPORT: NC Legislature Races to Watch 2018

With Democrats in 170 legislative seats, Republicans in 169, and even Libertarians filing in 35 legislative districts, 2018 is shaping up to be one of the most pivotal legislative elections in North Carolina history. And with no race on the ballot above Supreme Court, these elections will get more attention than ever before.

This report combines an analysis of district voting data, national and state polling plus qualitative factors like local issues and relative candidate strength. In total, we think that 35 House races and 13 Senate races are shaping up to have competitive campaigns run by both of the major parties in districts that could conceivably go to either. We have also identified a handful of other races worth keeping an eye on for other reasons.

We’ll look at the 35 House races and 13 Senate races we think will be the most competitive in the fall and a handfull of other races we think will be interesting to watch for other reasons. Read the House report here and the Senate report here

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REPORT: NC Legislature Races to Watch 2018

With Democrats in 170 legislative seats, Republicans in 169, and even Libertarians filing in 35 legislative districts, 2018 is shaping up to be one of the most pivotal legislative elections in North Carolina history. And with no race on the ballot above Supreme Court, these elections will get more attention than ever before.

This report combines an analysis of district voting data, national and state polling plus qualitative factors like local issues and relative candidate strength. In total, we think that 36 House races and 13 Senate races are shaping up to have competitive campaigns run by both of the major parties in districts that could conceivably go to either. We have also identified a handful of other races worth keeping an eye on for other reasons.

We’ll look at the 36 House races and 13 Senate races we think will be the most competitive in the fall and a handfull of other races we think will be interesting to watch for other reasons. 

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These 39 Republicans said they thought judges should be elected, rulings against their unconstitutional laws might have changed that

In 2012 Civitas asked candidates for office in NC if judges should continue to be elected by the voters. (2012 was the last time Civitas posted a survey.)

The answer from those that filled it out was a resounding yes.

27 current Republican members of the House said they agreed with the statement “Judges should continue to be elected by the voters.”

This included members such as Chris Malone, Debra Conrad, Ted Davis, and Jonathan Jordan.

Despite the widespread support for Judicial elections amongst the Republican caucus, rumors and even threats swirl that the Republican majorities in the legislature are considering moving to a legislative appointment process in the wake of several legal losses.

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Legislator Profile: John Bradford (R-Mecklenburg)

In this Real Facts Legislator Profile, we focus on Representative John Bradford, the Republican from House District 98. Before joining the General Assembly, Bradford was elected to the Cornelius Town Board in 2011. While there, he sought to cancel elections and have the town board elected every three years instead of two.  

Bradford was one of the co-sponsors of HB2. One year later, he co-sponsored a failed HB2 repeal bill that would make local anti-discrimination measures subject to a public referendum.

 “I voted to restore common sense regulations for North Carolina citizen’s rights to privacy in bathrooms and changing facilities.” – Rep. John Bradford, after voting for HB2 (The Herald Weekly, 03/31/16; The Southern Pines Pilot, 05/21/16)

Bradford has shown time and again that he believes tax cuts are more important than public education. Bradford said, “spending more in education will not magically solve the problems we are facing” and “we need to continue holding everyone accountable and find ways to cut bureaucratic and unnecessary expenses that we incur outside the classroom.” He voted for the 2017 Republican budget that continues the trend of cutting taxes for the wealth few rather than raising per pupil spending. Bradford said “we need to financially reward our best and brightest educators” but voted for the Republican budget that gives beginning teachers no raise, and only a 0.6 percent raise to experienced teachers and per pupil spending has actually gone down in the budgets he voted on. Read more on Bradford here

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A day late and a dollar short: Real Facts NC's step-by-step guide to remembering who sits on the committee you chair

After 13 years in the NC House of Representatives, even the simple tasks can apparently become confusing.

Just ask Representative Nelson Dollar (R-Wake), who, in yesterday’s House Appropriations Committee meeting, could hardly remember who belongs to the committee (of which he is the senior chairman) and who doesn’t.

After Representative Pricey Harrison (D-Guilford) raised her hand to debate an amendment and said her name aloud when Dollar failed to identify her from the front of the room, he asked, “Representative Harrison, are you on this committee?” to which she answered, “I am.”

 

To prevent this from happening again, Real Facts NC has compiled a step-by-step manual to help Rep. Dollar and any other weary members of the General Assembly remember the names and positions of their own colleagues.

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North Carolina Legislator Profile: Nelson Dollar (R-Wake)

In this legislator profile, we focus on Rep. Nelson Dollar, the Republican representative from District 36, who has been in the General Assembly for over a decade. Since the Republicans took control of the House in 2011, Dollar has been senior Chairman of the Appropriations Committee working as House Republicans main budget writer. According to the News & Observer, “officially” Nelson Dollar “is senior chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.  Unofficially, he’s the House gatekeeper.” Read more here.

“Most of the people who would have been covered by Medicaid expansion are ‘relatively healthy’ and could always get care in emergency rooms.” –Nelson Dollar (News & Observer, 10/14/13)

Summary

  • Dollar has consistently written budgets and policies that shortchange education at every level. Instead, prioritizing tax cuts for big corporations.
  • During the more than 10 years that Rep. Dollar has served in the legislature, he has eliminated policies that would aid his constituents
    • He advocated for cutting child care subsidies
    • He voted against Medicaid expansion
    • He supported a budget that eliminates the ability to access health insurance after retirement, for state employees hired after 2021
  • Dollar has used his position of power to benefit himself with lucrative consulting contracts.

Read more on Dollar here.

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North Carolina Legislator Profile: Rep. Jonathan Jordan (R-Ashe, Watauga)

In this Real Facts Legislator Profile, we focus on Rep. Jonathan Jordan, the Republican Representative from District 93. He was first elected in 2010 in a victory decided by fewer than 800 votes. He currently chairs the committees on Education, Homelessness, Foster Care and Dependency, the House Select Committee on Administrative Procedure Laws, and House Judiciary III. Jordan, an attorney, spent two years as the first research director at the conservative John Locke Foundation from 1997-1999, a 501(C)(3) research institute that espouses conservative ideals. He also served as the director for a tax-exempt pregnancy care center in Ashe County with the primary purpose of pseudo-science anti-abortion counseling. When he ran in 2010, Art Pope and outside groups flooded money into his campaign in a Koch-sponsored effort to flip the state legislature. Since his election, Jordan has pushed Pope ideals at the expensive of working people in North Carolina. Read more on Jordan here.

(NCFEP, Spending by Outside Groups in North Carolina General Assembly Races, 2010 Election Cycle, retrieved 6/21/12)
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North Carolina Legislator Profile: Rep. Chris Malone (R-Wake)

In this Real Facts Legislator Profile, we focus on Rep. Chris Malone, the Republican representative from District 35 and Deputy Majority Whip for the 2017-2018 legislative session. He was first elected in 2012 and currently serves as the chair of the Wildlife Resources Committee and the Appropriations on Health and Human Services Committee and vice chair of the Appropriations Committee. Malone’s political career started over 15 years ago as a Wake Forest Town Commissioner in 2001. He was on the Wake County School Board in 2009 until his resignation in 2012. During his time on the school board, he was called a “hard-liner” who “served without distinction.” As a Representative, Malone has sponsored bills that aimed to restore partisan judicial elections and bar federal Medicaid expansion. After being delinquent at least 25 times paying them, Malone tried to repeal motor vehicle renewal and property taxes – while voting to raise sales taxes on working families. Read more here.

Summary

  • Since 2002, Malone has been delinquent on personal property taxes at least 25 times
  • During his time on the school board, he:
    • was accused of burglary following an alleged affair with another board member, supported private school vouchers
    • looked to install less expensive heating, cooling, and ventilation systems in schools
    • worked to replace diversified schools with neighborhood schools
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