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North Carolina Legislator Profile Update: John Faircloth (R-Guilford)

Faircloth is a four-term legislator currently serving House District 61. However, due to redistricting Faircloth will be running in House District 62 in the upcoming election.

Faircloth failed to look out for the best interests of North Carolina public school teachers and students. He repeatedly voted for policies that failed to increase teacher pay to the national average and underfunded public education classrooms, leaving per pupil spending 6.7 percent below pre-recession level. In the 2018 budget, Faircloth chose to preserve tax breaks for those making over $200,000 rather than provide teachers with a larger pay increase. The policies Faircloth supports have left teachers worried about layoffs and wondering if the General Assembly has a “vendetta” against them.

Faircloth failed to stand up for North Carolina’s working families by twice voting to block Medicaid expansion. Faircloth’s refusal to expand Medicaid to 500,000 low-income North Carolinians cost 455 to 1,145 lives per year. Health care costs have since skyrocketed and North Carolina now has the third most expensive health care in the United States. Faircloth prioritized supporting tax cuts for the wealthy over expanding health care to the North Carolinians who need it most.

Faircloth repeatedly attacked the voting rights of North Carolinians by voting for discriminatory voter ID policies and unconstitutional voting maps. He supports voter ID and voted for the 2013 voter ID law that targeted African-Americans with “almost surgical precision” and the proposed constitutional amendment that could allow lawmakers to approve the same restrictive measures from the 2013 bill. Faircloth also voted for redistricting maps later ruled to be unconstitutional, including the 2011 maps in which his old district was found to be an illegal gerrymander. Despite overwhelming local opposition, Faircloth voted to overhaul the Greensboro City Council; these changes were later ruled unconstitutional because the districts were drawn to dilute the Democratic vote.

Read further to learn more about Faircloth’s voting record.


Source: Greensboro News & Record

“We’re going to be building on that. It’s a good foundation. And it will get much better.” – Faircloth on teacher pay that remains nearly $10,000 below the national average (Greensboro News & Record, 10/15/14)

Faircloth continually voted for Republican budgets that fail to provide teachers with adequate raises.

  • Faircloth voted for the 2018 budget, which prioritized tax cuts for the wealthy over meaningful teacher raises.
  • Faircloth voted for the 2017 budget, which kept starting teacher pay at $35,000 and provided veteran educators with a raise of only $30 per month, the cost of a tank of gas.
  • Faircloth voted for the 2015 budget, which provided a one-time $750 bonus to teachers, but failed to increase their salaries.
  • Faircloth voted for the 2013 budget, which kept North Carolina teacher pay near the bottom of national rankings and forced teachers into other jobs.

Faircloth voted for multiple policies that slashed education spending, including the 2013 budget that cut education spending by $500 million, leaving public education classrooms sorely underfunded.

  • The 2017 Republican budget spent 30 percent less on education than Governor Cooper’s proposed budget and left per pupil spending 6.7 percent below pre-recession level.
  • The 2013 Republican budget cut education spending by $500 million, including a decrease in net spending for public schools.
  • Faircloth voted for H13, which capped K-3 class sizes, but did not provide funding for the mandate, leaving teachers worried about layoffs.

Faircloth twice voted to block Medicaid expansion in North Carolina, leaving many low-income North Carolinians without access to health care.

  • In 2018 Faircloth voted to block Medicaid expansion using a procedural vote.
  • In 2013 Faircloth voted against expanding Medicaid to cover 500,000 low-income North Carolinians, costing 455 to 1,145 liver per year and resulting in higher costs for employers.
  • According to a 2017 study, North Carolina has the third most expensive health care in the US, in part due to state government decisions.

Faircloth supported unconstitutional laws that restrict access to the ballot.

  • Faircloth voted for the 2013 voter ID law, which was later struck down for targeting African-Americans with “almost surgical precision.”
  • Faircloth sponsored the proposed voter ID constitutional amendment, which could allow lawmakers to approve the same restrictive measures from the 2013 bill.
  • Faircloth voted for the 2011 maps, which were thrown out for being unconstitutional racial gerrymanders; his old district was found to be an illegal gerrymander.
  • Despite overwhelming local opposition, Faircloth voted for Greensboro City Council redistricting, which was later ruled unconstitutional.

Continue reading for more on Faircloth.