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McCrory’s evolving stories on HB2 discrimination bill

Immediate Action: McCrory threatened “immediate state legislative intervention” before passage of Charlotte ordinance. (Charlotte Observer2/22/16)

It can wait: McCrory said lawmakers should wait until short session in late April to deal with Charlotte Ordinance rather than call special session. (WRAL2/29/16)

Bill goes too far: McCrory said he wouldn’t call special session “saying he believes legislators are considering a measure that goes far beyond the Charlotte ordinance.” Lt. Gov. and Speaker called session over McCrory’s objection. (News & Observer3/21/16Charlotte Observer3/23/16)

Signed within hours of receiving: McCrory signed bill the same night it was introduced and passed. (New York Times3/23/16)

Changes Nothing: McCrory says that “nothing has actually changed” and that it does not take away any existing rights. (Politifact3/30/16)

Concerns with some provisions: McCrory “expressed concerns over some of the provisions” after signing. (Wilmington Star News3/31/16)

Open to tweaks: McCrory says he is open to “tweaks” (Winston-Salem Journal, 3/31/16)

McCrory threatened “immediate state legislative intervention” before passage of Charlotte ordinance.

McCrory threatened “immediate state legislative intervention” if Charlotte passed bathroom ordinance changes for transgender residents. “Gov. Pat McCrory warned two Charlotte City Council members Sunday that if the city approves new legal protections for gay, lesbian and transgender people on Monday, the vote would ‘most likely cause immediate state legislative intervention.’ McCrory is concerned about a provision in the proposed expanded ordinance that would allow transgender residents to use either a men’s or a women’s bathroom. That part of the ordinance has also caused a furor in Charlotte and led to the ordinance being defeated 6-5 last year.” (Charlotte Observer2/22/16)

McCrory was concerned bathroom ordinance change would create “public safety issues” due to “deviant actions.” “‘It is not only the citizens of Charlotte that will be impacted by changing basic restroom and locker room norms but also citizens from across our state and nation who visit and work in Charlotte,’ McCrory said in an email to the council’s two Republicans, Ed Driggs and Kenny Smith. ‘This shift in policy could also create major public safety issues by putting citizens in possible danger from deviant actions by individuals taking improper advantage of a bad policy.’ McCrory, a Republican, continued: ‘Also, this action of allowing a person with male anatomy, for example, to use a female restroom or locker room will most likely cause immediate State legislative intervention which I would support as governor.’” (Charlotte Observer2/22/16)

  • NY Times Editorial Board said threat of transgender women as potential rapists “exists only in the imagination of bigots.”  “Proponents of so-called bathroom bills, which have been introduced in state legislatures across the country, have peddled them by spuriously portraying transgender women as potential rapists.  That threat exists only in the imagination of bigots. Supporters of the measures have been unable to point to a single case that justifies the need to legislate where people should be allowed to use the toilet. North Carolina is the first state to pass such a provision.” (NY Times, Editorial, 3/25/16)

McCrory said lawmakers should wait until short session in late April to deal with Charlotte Ordinance rather than call special session.

McCrory said lawmakers should wait until short session in late April to deal with Charlotte Ordinance rather than call special session. “Gov. Pat McCrory says lawmakers should wait until their scheduled return on April 25 to address Charlotte’s new ordinance on transgender rights rather than call a special session in the next two months. ‘My inclination is to support efforts to have a bill introduced as soon as we come into short session,’ McCrory said Monday afternoon.” (WRAL2/29/16)

McCrory said he wouldn’t call special session “saying he believes legislators are considering a measure that goes far beyond the Charlotte ordinance.” Lt. Gov. and Speaker called session over McCrory’s objection.

McCrory said he wouldn’t call special session “saying he believes legislators are considering a measure that goes far beyond the Charlotte ordinance.” Lt. Gov. and Speaker called session over McCrory’s objection. “North Carolina legislative leaders announced Monday that they’ll convene a special legislative session Wednesday to deal with Charlotte’s controversial LGBT ordinance. Lawmakers acted on their own after Republican Gov. Pat McCrory declined to call a special session, saying he believes legislators are considering a measure that goes far beyond the Charlotte ordinance. But Lt. Gov. Dan Forest, who oversees the Senate, and House Speaker Tim Moore, both Republicans, invoked a seldom-used constitutional provision to call themselves into session at 10 a.m. Wednesday.” (News & Observer3/21/16)

HEADLINE: “NC GOP expands special session beyond restroom policies to wages, workplace rights.” “Proposed legislation for Wednesday’s unusual special General Assembly session wasn’t released publicly Tuesday, but legislative leaders indicate the bill could go well beyond halting Charlotte and other local governments from issuing mandates for transgender people on bathrooms and locker rooms. A five-page draft acquired by the Observer Wednesday morning showed legislators appear to be looking for a tradeoff with businesses that would forbid cities from raising minimum wages, perhaps in hopes of muffling corporate complaints that denying LGBT rights is bad for business.” (Charlotte Observer3/23/16)

McCrory signed bill the same night it was introduced and passed

McCrory signed H2 late the same night it was passed. “North Carolina legislators, in a whirlwind special session on Wednesday, passed a wide-ranging bill barring transgender people from bathrooms and locker rooms that do not match the gender on their birth certificates. Republicans unanimously supported the bill, while in the Senate, Democrats walked out in protest. ‘This is a direct affront to equality, civil rights and local autonomy,’ the Senate Democratic leader, Dan Blue, said in a statement. North Carolina’s governor, Pat McCrory, a Republican, signed the bill late Wednesday night.” (New York Times3/23/16)

  • In “hastily convened, one-day special session” McCrory signed bill within 12 hours of it being published.  “The North Carolina General Assembly yesterday passed legislation that locks out lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender citizens from anti-discrimination laws in employment and public accommodations. In a hastily convened, one-day special session of the legislature, House Bill 2 went from publication to ratification to being signed into law by Governor Pat McCrory in 12 hours.” (Forbes, 3/24/16)

McCrory “expressed concerns over some of the provisions” after signing but says that “nothing has actually changed” and that it does not take away any existing rights.

McCrory said he signed the bill “while it may not be perfect” and said he “expressed concerns over some of the provisions that were in the legislation.” “In a video statement released late Tuesday afternoon, McCrory said, ‘I did not call for a special session. I expressed concerns over some of the provisions that were in the legislation. But at the end of the day the General Assembly acted within the provisions of the constitution and presented me with a bill that, while it may not be perfect, provided protection of our basic expectation of privacy in public restrooms and locker rooms. ‘I signed that bill because if I didn’t, on April 1, the expectation of privacy of North Carolina citizens could be violated.’” (Wilmington Star News3/31/16)

McCrory claimed new law did not take away any existing rights, “nothing has actually changed.” “A major talking point has been that, even despite the new law, nothing has actually changed. Gov. Pat McCrory has said as much in person as well as in written statements. Other GOP leaders who supported the bill have done the same. ‘We have not taken away any rights that have currently existed in any city in North Carolina, from Raleigh to Durham to Chapel Hill to Charlotte,’ McCrory said at a press conference Monday. “Every city and every corporation has the exact same discrimination policy this week as they had two weeks ago.” (Politifact3/30/16)

McCrory says he is open to “tweaks”

HEADLINE: “McCrory suggests tweaks possible to new NC law as others weigh in on controversy.” “McCrory and a key state senator are suggesting that some tweaks are possible down the road for the new state law restricting local government action on LGBT protections that has received calls for repeal from gay-rights groups and corporations nationwide. In a video message this week defending his decision to sign the law, McCrory offered to “work on solutions that will make this bill better in the future.” He didn’t provide suggestions but reaffirmed that the law was needed to ensure privacy for people using restrooms and locker rooms. N.C. Sen. Tom Apodaca, the chairman of the Senate Rules Committee, said in an interview Wednesday that some small changes were possible.” (Winston-Salem Journal, 3/31/16)