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Gov. McCrory Should Concede

As of Friday afternoon, Governor-elect Roy Cooper’s lead over Pat McCrory has grown to 7,448 votes. The results are clear. Roy Cooper won and now it’s time for Governor McCrory to concede. Gov. McCrory has no path to victory, yet he continues to level desperate attacks against lawful voters, African-American community organizations, and his own appointees to local Boards of Elections.

County Boards of Elections, led by Republicans appointed by the McCrory administration, in Wake, Mecklenburg, Halifax, Durham, and Orange counties, and soon to be more, have rejected Gov. McCrory’s frivolous and unfounded complaints.Gov. McCrory is trying to undermine the results of the election, because he is disappointed with the results, but at this point, he’s only undermining his own reputation.

After a bitter and negative campaign season, it’s time for North Carolina to come together and help our new Governor to be successful.Gov. McCrory should go ahead and concede. The voters have spoken. The writing is on the wall. Calling for a recount would only waste $1.5 million in taxpayer dollars with no hope of making up such a substantial lead. There’s time for Gov. McCrory to deliver a graceful concession, instead of continuing to embarrass himself and our state.

Background

  • Cooper leads McCrory by 7,448 votes. (Cooper Campaign press call, 11/18/16)
  • By Thursday, the McCrory campaign has filed election complaints in 52 counties. (News & Observer, 11/17/16) By Friday afternoon, McCrory campaign complaints have already been dismissed in Wake, Mecklenburg, Durham, Orange and Halifax counties. (WRAL, 11/18/16)
  • A statewide recount will not change the outcome. After three Congressional-level recounts in North Carolina since 2000, the largest change was only 6 votesIn 2006, Larry Kissell gained 2 votes. In 2010, Bob Etheridge gained 6 votes and in 2012, David Rouzer gained only 1 vote. (Charlotte Observer, 11/9/16)
  • Others have gracefully conceded with similar vote margins:

2016: Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte from New Hampshire conceded with a vote margin of only 1,023 votes. (Christian Science Monitor, 11/10/16

2014: Republican Ed Gillespie conceded to Sen. Mark Warner three days after Election Day after county canvasses showed him further behind than on Election Day. (Washington Post, 11/7/14

2012: Linda Coleman conceded to Dan Forest in the NC Lieutenant Governor’s race without asking for a recount, despite losing by fewer than 10,000 votes. (Fayetteville Observer, 11/20/12